Tuesday, 24 April 2012

The Kabarak call for peace and ecojustice


The Kabarak call for peace and ecojustice was approved today at Friends World Conference, Kabarak University, Nakuru, Kenya.

from the FWCC World Consultation on Global Change 2010-11
and participants’ witness in the GC thread at the Friends World Conference 2012


In past times God’s Creation restored itself. Now humanity dominates, our growing population consuming more resources than nature can replce. We must change, we must become careful stewards of all life. Earthcare unites traditional Quaker testimonies: peace, equality, simplicity, love, integrity, and justice. Jesus said “As you have done unto the least… you have done unto me”. We are called to work for the peaceable Kingdom of God on the whole earth, in right sharing with all peoples. However few our numbers, we are called to be the salt that flavors and preserves, to be a light in the darkness of greed and destruction.

We have heard of the disappearing snows of Kilimanjaro and glaciers of Bolivia, from which come life-giving waters. We have heard appeals from peoples of the Arctic, Asia and Pacific. We have heard of forests cut down, seasons disrupted, wildlife dying, of land hunger in Africa, of new diseases, droughts, floods, fires, famine and desperate migrations – this climatic chaos is now worsening. There are wars and rumors of war, job loss, inequality and violence. We fear our neighbors. We waste our children’s heritage.

All of these are driven by our dominant economic systems – by greed not need, by worship of the market, by Mammon and Caesar.

Is this how Jesus showed us to live?

•       We are called to see what love can do:
to love our neighbor as ourselves, to aid the widow and orphan, to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable, to appeal to consciences and bind the wounds.

•       We are called to teach our children right relationship, to live in harmony with each other and all living beings in the earth, waters and sky of our Creator, who asks, “Where were you when I laid the foundations of the world?” (Job 38.4)

•       We are called to do justice to all and walk humbly with our God, to cooperate lovingly with all who share our hopes for the future of the earth.

•       We are called to be patterns and examples, in a 21st century campaign for peace and ecojustice, as difficult and decisive as the 19th century abolition of slavery

We dedicate ourselves to let the living waters flow through us -- where we live, regionally, and in wider world fellowship. We dedicate ourselves to building the peace that passeth all understanding, to the repair of the world, opening our lives to the Light to guide us in each small step.

Bwana asifiwe.  Apu Dios Awqui.  Gracias Jesύs.   Jubilé.   Salaam aleikum.  Migwetch.  Tikkun olam.  Alleluia!

8 comments:

sophie said...

Today plant a tree or bush or herb. Then sit with it for a bit.

Cathy said...

So what are you actually, practically, and experimentally going to DO?

fdmillar said...

Dear Cathy
A number of Quaker bodies, as well as individual Friends, will be working within this framework, approved only a week ago. Probably for decades.

As for myself: I just returned from Kenya a few days ago. I am currently attending a two day meeting with aboriginal peoples, citizen groups and environmental NGOs in Quebec City as Quaker rep to a Montreal interfaith group. As soon as I get home I must leave again for national Kairoscanada meeting in Toronto May 7-8. Each of these groups is undertaking specific actions of various kinds.

As well, hundreds if not thousands of Quakers worldwide are now confirmed in their concerns and ongoing actions by this decision of the world conference (which occurs only every 20 years), climaxing three years of consultation with Quakers on every continent. Our earthcare and peace work with other people of good faith will continue, now officially approved by all Quakers.

Jere Licciardello said...

The future will set spouse at odds with spouse and brother against sister, as we each come to a slightly different set of personal terms, terms that allow each of us to live in an uneasy balance between our personal life andtheneeds of society and the world. I don't attempt to change the views of my wife on matters where her mind is firmly made up. I won't say my decision to marry was wrong. In fact, I deny it emphatically. Will I place my priorities for the earth above my marriage? Such disparate prioritizations are nothing new in the world. I ask others to look within, and find ways to raise topics in ways that bring your marriage into harmony with the needs of the each. For me prayer helps, and watching myself with unparalleled honesty to speak as I should for my own conscience, and turn away from "marriagespeak".

Jere Licciardello said...

Since the issues in marriage approaching retirement are so particular, I let my wife know all about my quaker commitment to the Kabarack Call. There is no simple way to explain the tearing I feel between how I live and what I believe. I pray, and hold that spouses don't arrive at the truth on eco justice, as to how to live. When she comes around, maybe she will leapfrog me. Marriage does change things. There are always options perhaps.

fdmillar said...

I think we all struggle with our own consciences about these things. The gap between what we know is needed, and our own habits (at least in the developed world), is wide enough to be called hypocrisy. It would be quite wrong to force others' consciences. What we can do is support and encourage every small step -- by ourselves as well as others.

Julie said...

This is for Cathy: Beginning with a statement of agreement is vital, following by DOing is equally so. In fact, I have a further query - our family has spent more than 40 years following what is now conservation of resource practice - energy efficient home heated by wood, forest management, raise food, share home with others, work at home, yes- use electricity but worked for hydro dam for a number years and also work to close nuclear power facility near us, travel sometimes but contribute to reforestation, etc. etc. However, through my work in international development, I see, daily, good efforts overwhelmed by population growth. Can Quakers commit to zero population growth? That is a difficult question. What people can do is delay starting families for a decade or two beyond the norms and then keep them as small as possible.

Julie said...

This is for Cathy: Beginning with a statement of agreement is vital, following by DOing is equally so. In fact, I have a further query - our family has spent more than 40 years following what is now conservation of resource practice - energy efficient home heated by wood, forest management, raise food, share home with others, work at home, yes- use electricity but worked for hydro dam for a number years and also work to close nuclear power facility near us, travel sometimes but contribute to reforestation, etc. etc. However, through my work in international development, I see, daily, good efforts overwhelmed by population growth. Can Quakers commit to zero population growth? That is a difficult question. What people can do is delay starting families for a decade or two beyond the norms and then keep them as small as possible.